Immanuel Lutheran Church LCMS
Fairview/Allen, TX
Sermons
Series C, 2018-2019


In fact, you can believe and trust in what Jesus says because He, IN FACT, is risen from the dead.

Epiphany 6C - 1 Cor. 15:1-20; Luke 6:17-26 - v20 - "But in fact, Christ is risen from the dead..."

          St. Paul preaches today in his sermon to the congregation gathered in Corinth using only facts. This is why he writes to them one of the first creeds of the New Testament. IF you notice in v3-4 this is the pattern we have set for our creeds. We are a creedal church because these are the facts. Our faith is not based on feelings or sentiments. Like most people we have a desire for facts. We want to know the facts. We want to know the truth. With every political story now we have the so called “fact checkers.” Mark Twain wrote that facts are stubborn things. There are a few stubborn things we can call facts. Fact 1, Don’t pay your taxes and you can be sure Uncle Sam will come knocking. Fact 2, you are getting older. Now that’s not so bad, except getting older means death. In fact, as hard as we might try, death is coming for us all. Sorry to bring such a downer to our gathering this morning, after the great Sunday School class, hey as a reminder, we have about an hour or so set aside before church for you to come and learn about God’s word with fellow Christians. You are invited!

After such a great time in Sunday School I almost feel I have to apologize,  but facts are stubborn things. Try as you might, spend as you can, run as fast as you can muster, death is one heart beat away. One breath, one step, one slip. In fact, 105 people have just taken their last breath in this last minute. Facts, how fun. Lest you want to fact check my statistic, that little fact was from the Ecology Global Network. Uncle Sam will come knocking looking for his fair share of your taxes but so will his more sinister and more persistent partner death. There is no arbitration, there is no payment plan. In fact, death demands payment in full.

Now there are many ways you can try to avoid the tax man. In fact, you can try to disappear. Move to Mexico. Get off the grid as they say. You can declare bankruptcy but even then there are technicalities that Uncle Sam will get his share.

In a world of unknowns and fake facts we don’t always know what to believe, in fact out of desperation we have the saying "nothing is sure but death and taxes". People try to be very creative and hide from taxes but the scriptures even teach us, “Pay taxes to whom taxes are owed.” But what about death? How can we hide from death?

Well believe it or not this is one connection between our Gospel, OT and epistle reading. Beginning with Jeremiah we hear the prophet utter the words of God, ““Cursed is the man bwho trusts in man and makes flesh his strength”. Cursed is the man who trusts himself or what man finds security in. In fact, cursed are you when you believe that the rewards in this life far outweigh the rewards of knowing Christ in eternal life. St. Paul writes if you only follow Christ because in this life it gets you places of honor, you are to be pitied above all. And finally in the Gospel reading Jesus shows us that chasing honor in the way of the world may bring temporary happiness but that happiness is not truly happiness. It may seem like joy and blessing but in reality it is rotting away your soul with false security.

Like the person who spends mounds of money on expesive cars and jewels and thinks that that is where life is, yet they watch it all get reposesed and they have nothing but a jail cell when the tax bill comes. In fact, none of it was theirs to begin with. Just a figment, not reality. In fact all along they had nothing because what they owed was far more than what they could pay.

Facts are stubborn things when it comes to taxes and death. What do you owe? Do not fear I am not working for the IRS and despite current opinions on the matter I am not trying to kill you with long sermons. The fact of the matter is that no matter how high and mighty we might feel because we always pay our due or we always meet budget, there comes the bill for your sins of failing to see the world as Jesus does. How do we try to hide that little fact? How we look for honor and security in the things of this life. When things go well we think, In fact, I have nothing to worry about. Our sinful nature leads us to trust in the gifts of God rather than Christ. In the end we begin to look just like the unbelieving world.

The rich that Jesus proclaims woes upon are those who have no need for Christ. It doesn’t matter how much money you have or don’t have, do you recognize the true riches in Christ? Do you trust your comforts in this life more than Christ? It is generally the case that when we have money to spare we begin to trust in it a little too much.

The full are not necessarily those who have plenty to eat, that would disqualify all of us pretty quick. It is those who don’t recognize the ongoing need to be filled with Christ. Specifically the need for the Lord’s Supper. If you see no need for the Lord’s Supper you are missing out on a gift that Christ gives to fill you with his righteousness. In fact, if you are numb to the Lord’s Supper you are the full Jesus warns about.

All of these blessings and woes are intimately connected to our daily lives yet are also spiritual. Jesus hits us right between the eyes with stubborn facts in Luke 6. Blessed are you when you are poor, hungry and when you are weeping. Blessed are you when people revile you on account for being a Christian.” Jesus doesn’t just say endure it, he says, “Leap for joy in that day because your reward in heaven will be great.” Of all the things we pursue in this life none of them will measure up to the joy we will see in heaven. In heaven we will see what we only behold by faith now.

Jesus can encourage us to endure these things because he has seen the worst the world can throw at him. In fact Christ took the judgment for your sins on the cross. Christ not only took the world’s judgment for being faithful but he also took on God’s judgment for your sins. Jesus doesn’t teach us to hide from our sins. Hiding from Uncle Sam is a terrible burden. A life on the run is punishment enough. Imagine trying to hide from God! Jesus doesn’t show us where to hide, but he pays our bill. He cancels our debt. He suffered and died without God coming to his aid. Fact, this was the punishment meant for you. For all the shallow chasings after the pleasures of this world. Thinking that when we are comfortable we don’t really need Jesus. That forgivness of sins is some trivial thing in this life. That we try to cheat God by not sharing with those around us or we don’t pray and give thanks after what he has given to each of us. So often we forget that all that we have is a gift from God. We begin to think that God owes us things in this life. By God I’ve worked hard for my money, my prestige, my professional portfolio, my 401k. Jesus says blessed are you when those things fail. Why?

Because when we place our hope and trust in things other than Christ and his resurrection from the dead for the forgiveness of our sins we are in jeopardy of losing our faith. Fact, is it better to lose a little in this life and yet gain eternal life and all the riches of Christ Jesus or is it better to gain the worship of those who are going to hell?

Jesus is pretty matter of fact describing how it is in this life if we are to be faithful to him. Do you see his example? Do you remember how the world treated Jesus? He wasn’t fawned over by the politicians and rich celebrities. He was laughed at. He was scorned. And you and I try so hard to win the approval of the world. Fact, you cannot have two masters. He was thought a joke but he has the last laugh. In fact, Christ Jesus was raised from the dead.

And because Jesus Christ was risen from the dead, death is no longer a certain fact for those who are found in Christ. He feeds us life. He gives us riches. He teaches us to laugh at the devil and his attempts to take away that which Christ has given us by his death for our sin. Forgiveness. Our riches and security, our joy, our fullness is his word and sacrament delivering God's grace to you!

And that brings us to the fact, the undisputable fact that St. Paul writes for us today, In fact, Christ was raised from the dead. That fact upsets all that we think is factual in this life. When we suffer we think that that is in fact the worst that can happen. But Jesus says no.

This is why we say amen to what Jesus says in our Gospel reading even though it sounds so contrary to fact. In fact, Christ was raised from the dead. He knows that none of the things we think are so factual are actually enduring. So our faith is not based on emotions or some warm feeling you get when you see a beautiful sunset or watch an infant child coo in your arms. Christianity is based on a singular fact, Christ is raised from the dead.

So no matter what, fact, consider yourself blessed when you suffer. Consider yourself blessed to be hungry, consider yourself blessed to mourn. He may take away your false Gods, but He will never take away his love for you. This is why we continue to confess the creeds. They are the facts we believe in. If a church no longer confesses the creeds she is a church in danger of believing in a false Jesus. A Jesus not supported by facts but a Jesus invented by their own desires. Often that Jesus begins to show his approval in big audiences, riches in your life, living your best life now. The problem is that is contrary to what Jesus says today in verse 23. Your best life is not now but with him in heavenly bliss lived out in the resurrection. That is our best life and that is the life we want even for our enemies.  You can trust Jesus when he sounds so "contrary to fact" in his blessings and woes because IN FACT, He is risen from the dead and his faithful will rise again. We have nothing to fear. 

 

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Epiphany 1C

Epiphany is God taking upon himself our identity not to protect himself, but to give us life. To protect us…from ourselves. To protect us from our sins.

          As of Jan 6 we have once again changed church seasons. The 12 days of Christmas are over and we are in Epiphany. Christmas shows us and teaches us that this baby who is born from Mary is the eternal God. That even though this child is fully man, he is also divine. At Christmas we are taught about Jesus’ divinity.

          Epiphany shows us that Jesus is also one with humanity. Jesus is divine, the eternal word made flesh. Epiphany is the time of year we focus on the identity of Jesus being revealed in various ways. God was also truly man, one of us. This is what the baptism of Jesus reveals to us. God comes down to be one of us.

          In our world there are many times famous people try to hide their identity. When checking into hotels or making reservations celebrities use an alias.  They do this of course to protect themselves from being noticed. When robbing a bank people often wear a disguise to protect themselves. This happens in the Bible too. Abraham and Sarah were traveling in Egypt and Abraham was afraid the Pharaoh would kill him to take Sarah so they told Pharoah that Sarah was his sister. They used a false identity for their own benefit. To protect themselves.

          Jesus doesn’t use his divinity to protect himself to stay far off from sinners but Jesus comes to be baptized with sinners.  To show us and the world that he has come to be one with sinners. Our reading begins with Luke telling us that The people were in expectation. Why? They thought John a good Messiah, or at least pretty close. What are you in expectation for? A new you for 2019? New job? I was hoping for a Cowboys Superbowl but that expectation has been  stopped rather quickly. What are you in expectation, eager expectation for more that following Christ's word this year? What do you think about that? Have you reflected on the sin of desiring an identity that the world considers more valuable than following Jesus?

          John lived a life of solitary confinement being out in the wilderness. John’s life was one of rebuke. Calling people to repent.  He reminded them of Elijah. He brought a message of God's wrath. That because of sin man is far from God’s righteousness. Many believed this is how God should be, far away from sinners. That each person should find their way to God in heaven. That God has done his part, now you must do yours. But John says this is not how it will be.

          When asked if John was the Messiah John says no. He is not the Messiah. rhe who is mightier than I is coming, sthe strap of whose sandals I am not worthy to untie.

          This would fit most people’s idea of God. HE is so above humanity we can’t even stoop down to untie his sandals. Look at John’s humbleness. How we should learn from John how to repent of our pride with respect to the identity of God.

          John doesn’t even consider himself worthy to untie Jesus’ sandals. John doesn’t pretend he is perfect. John doesn’t claim a perfect identity because he knows that is a lie. When we are accused of wrong doing the first thing we do is make excuses. “It’s not my fault.” John puts us fallen sinners in our place by preaching the truth. That indeed we aren’t worthy to untie Jesus’ sandals. Don’t claim innocence when you have sinned against someone. Confess your sins to one another. And when someone has done wrong to you forgive them for they are not any different from you. People thought john was the Messiah and John didn’t use this to build himself up above others but he teaches us how far we have fallen and calls all sinners to repent. Not to claim innocence like some false identity. that we can trick God by claiming innocence. Perhaps we can trick others, but not God. God knows us better than we know ourselves. If others around us knew the thoughts that run through our minds we would be ashamed to even show our faces in public and we believe we have a valid argument in claiming innocence.

          John baptized with water a baptism of repentance. But the Savior will come and He will baptize you twith the Holy Spirit and ufire.17 His vwinnowing fork is in his hand, to clear his threshing floor and to wgather the wheat into his barn, xbut the chaff he will burn with yunquenchable fire.”

          John baptized all who came to him in at the Jordan river for repentance. All types came out to him. If a person was a sinner, they qualified for this baptism. Who could be worthy for the baptism of the Holy Spirit and fire? Verse 17 sounds more realistic for us sinners who are far from God, to be burned with the chaff.

          But next we hear  how John continued to preach the good news. That Jesus comes to himself be baptized with a  baptism of repentance. Jesus was baptized to show John and us that Jesus is indeed the one who is the Savior. The odd thing about this Savior is that he doesn’t use his identity to protect himself from the result of sin. Jesus is baptized to show how he is truly one who shares in humanity with us. Jesus comes to be your sin. To take your identity as sinner to the cross. Jesus will stand before the Father wearing your sin saying this is mine.

          While we might use an alias to protect ourselves, or we might lie when confronted with our sins to protect ourselves, God becomes true man in order that he would be one with sinners. When Jesus is baptized the spirit descends on him and this is God showing all that Jesus is the sinless one. Jesus is perfect. The one with whom the father is pleased. The perfect one to rescue humanity. You see Jesus takes an identity that is not his, Jesus stands with other sinners being baptized. Jesus takes the alias of sinner. At his baptism Jesus is singled out by the Spirit to be baptized again but baptized on the cross.

          Later closer to his crucifixion Jesus will speak of his cross as a baptism. One way to look at this is to see how on the cross Jesus is covered with the father’s wrath. That Jesus is drowned into God’s fiery wrath at sin when he is crucified and dead.  The result of Jesus’ baptism on the cross is that the world is purified. God’s wrath at your sin is absorbed fully by Jesus.

          So this is how we can read the baptism of the Holy Spirit and fire. That when we are baptized into Jesus we are given the Holy Spirit and our sins are burned away. Baptism brings faith and forgiveness. We are not left alone. We are not left to find our way to heaven but God becomes one with humanity to bring humanity back to him.  To forgive you. For because of Jesus becoming man becoming your sin, he gives you his righteousness and he will never take that away.

          Celebrities use their identity as a reason to separate themselves from sinners, the unimportant reserving for themselves all the goods. Jesus uses his identity as God to bring us with him up again to a place of honor far above any earthly glory we might desire. Jesus doesn't stay away from us but forgives us so that we would be identified as sons of God!

          SO now you do have a new identity. Being baptized your old sinful self is burned away and all that remains is a forgiven child of God. This is why St. Paul says, being baptized into Christ We know that wour old self1 xwas crucified with him in order that ythe body of sin might be brought to nothing,” baptism gives you a new identity that was not yours. You are given the identity of Jesus. It is the work of God, that’s why we talk so much about baptism. God places his name on you, no matter your age. He claims you. You are one whom the father is well pleased with because the burning that took place on the cross purifies you. So everytime you see your sins repent and know that God does not consider you according to your sins but according to your new identity. This is no alias it is a reality. God, unlike Abraham, unlike you and I, cannot lie.  We may fool ourselves into doubting our new identity but your sins are not held against you. It is as if you have never sinned. For Christ’s sake God says, “you are precious in my eyes, and honored, and I love you, …Fear not, for I am with you;

          God doesn’t use his divinity to stay far from us sinners. It is precisely his divinity that enables him to come to us and rescue us. This is a guarantee of your salvation. Jesus’ baptism teaches us that Jesus has taken upon himself our humanity to give us his identity as a son of God.     

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Advent 2 - Luke 3:1-14

Advent 2C

God calls us to come to the wilderness repenting of our sins  that we may bear fruits of repentance.

          There is something about being in the wild that makes us humans believe we are getting closer to God. Pushing away the hustle and bustle of everyday life. The solitude. The silence. The call of the wild.

          Being out in the middle of the wilderness. Nothing to bother you. Just you and God. Except for today the Advent lesson of John the Baptist we might assume the wilderness to be a place where we choose to meet God. I would like for you to consider why people like escaping to the wilderness because it is not only there that the cries from your boss to work more efficiently or your parents or your kids ask for your time, but really it is also the place that God does not speak. There is no condemnation for your sins. No call to change. I believe that we sinful humans believe that we are closer to God in the wilderness precisely because we are away from God’s accusing word. Or if we do take a Bible with us, we can think what we want about God’s word. We can be our own little church and have a god of our own choosing.

          Now I’m not saying there’s no benefit to retreating to a silent place, even going out to find solitude, Jesus even did that. Jesus did that for an opportunity to rest and pray. That is good and right. We should do this. However, our text today presents us with a lesson concerning where God’s word is found and what that means for our lives.

          The reason we hear from John the Baptist during Advent because we find him in the wilderness. A place of fasting. A place of losing the comforts of regular life. A place where we look afar and see the city where life is easy, a place where the people revel in the pleasures of their flesh, eating drinking being merry. We do not find John the Baptist in the city with all the pleasures the city offers.

We find John in a place where God’s people often find themselves. The OT with Moses the Exodus from Egypt, no water. No food. No luxuries. Adam and Eve banished from the Garden driven into the wilderness. Elijah fleeing Jezebel, reflecting on his failures and how there seemed to be no other believers. Churches were empty and Elijah said God just kill me now. The wilderness is a place of discipline. A place where God strips away all the comforts of life and it is a place of desperation. Jesus too, out into the wilderness and who did he find? Not Smokey the Bear but the devil. To fast, to be tempted but to finally find himself in prayer.

          So you want to go out to the wilderness to meet God? You think you will find solitude? Today we hear what you will find, you will find John the Baptist. Well we might not find him today in person, but you can’t help when you are all alone, when things are quiet to reflect on your life. When we do this we should assess our life in regards to God’s standards. Do you get angry or lose your patience? Do you find it more satisfying to get a good deal on Christmas gifts than receiving the gifts of God’s forgiveness? Do you think your sins are no big deal? Just a little mistake…You know better than that because you’ve probable got sins that haunt you.

John the Baptist is a relief because he brings the truth to our wildernesses. He is a doctor who accurately diagnosis us. A park ranger who sees the fire and points it out. He preaches a God who is not satisfied with your sins. In the wilderness you do not find a God who accepts you as you are. The wilderness is fine and dandy when the trees are green there’s no storms but the wilderness can also be the most dangerous unpredictable place when it is on fire as we’ve seen in CA. When we venture into the wilderness of God’s law we need to prepare and that is the Advent lesson for us as John beckons us out to find him. John doesn’t say find solitude he says listen to him. God sends him to us to rightly teach us how to meet God.

          John is the forerunner to Christ. As a forerunner he tells us how to prepare. He’s the scout leader making you double check your supply list. He is your dad asking if you have enough gas to get home. Your mom asking if you have clean underwear. Your grandma asking why you don’t have more food, here wait I’ll get a sandwich for you to take along, you’ll get hungry. John gives you what you need. First and foremost John says repent.

          God directs us and all those people in Judea out to the wilderness. Leave your good deeds. Leave your possessions. Leave your family. Your friends. Your house, don’t worry about cleaning, leave it. Leave everything. It is like death. What will you take to the grave? That’s your packing list. Go. Go and listen.

          And what does John say? You brood of vipers! What?!! That’s not very nice John. Matthew says John said this to the scribes and Pharisees. Luke leaves the target of the sermon open, meaning Luke wants you to hear it addressed to you. For if John preaches this to the well respected people of his day, those who were morally upright, the well to do, the folks who everyone wanted to be like. The highly respected, almost royalty, Luke says, “Where does this leave you?” If John addressed this to those who did not have faith but whose lives were admired by all the people because of their dedication to God’s law this leaves us the faithful no excuse for living sinful lives of neglecting God’s word and being lazy.

          Out in the wilderness God is not silent on this day. The wilderness is roaring. The wilderness is God’s fiery wrath come to meet you dressed in camel hair clothes and a diet of locust and honey. 400 yrs the wilderness was silent but here in John the Baptist God’s word goes forth. God would not have his people be unprepared for his coming. So in preparing for Jesus John tells us to drop dead.

          John says come to the Jordan river out into the wilderness, don’t prepare by gathering together the things that make you so prideful. This is one instance that God does direct his people to go into the wilderness but that is because that is where his preacher is. This is where God is present, leveling the mountains of your pride and filling the valleys of your despair over our shame. John brings the proud down and lifts the desperate up. Malachi says he is like a purifying fire. There is a fire in the wilderness a fire that is 0% contained. Johns preaching of God’s law burned away all that was not pure.

          To those who were being refined John had a hydrant of God's mercy, a baptism of forgiveness. All the sins they committed burned way by the waters of God’s purifying promise in the Jordan water.  Then what was the result?

John laid the groundwork for Jesus to bring his baptism a greater baptism because when Christ institutes baptism in Matthew 28 it is into the fully revealed name of father, son and holy spirit. The water is not tied to the Jordan nor a man John. Jesus gives a baptism that spans time and space and places us in him.

Because in Jesus the fire of God's wrath is fully contained. Jesus contains that forest fire of God’s wrath at our sin on the cross. Christ was driven out to the desert to be tempted and he did not fall. Christ takes all your shameful sins and gives you his glorious life. Christ’s whole life was not one where he withdrew for his own benefit but always for ours so we would have a savior. Christ was called out into the wilderness not because he was stressed or tired or just needed to recharge, Christ was driven to the wilderness to show his faithfulness to you. There he was alone, the wilderness of temptation, the forest fire of his cross and he was burned up for your sins, big sins, little sins and those that might haunt you. Your baptism was also a refining. A placing of you with Christ in his death and raising you with him as well. Out of the wilderness and into the oasis of God's mercy.

After John had baptized those at the Jordan with a baptism of repentance for forgiveness what did they do? What is the voice of faith? It is not how can I live a life of solitude, but what must I do? John says “Serve your neighbor where God has placed you faithfully.” John didn’t make them all prophets nor did he make them all preachers but he did tell them to go and sin no more. Be faithful where God has placed you. “What shall we do?” is the question of faith and one you should be asking yourself regularly. Notice John doesn’t tell them to quit their jobs, but to bear fruits of repentance. Let your life show evidence of faith. Even the vocation of soldier is blessed here in God’s word.

So return to God’s wilderness often. The place where you leave all your pride, the place you go carrying no supplies but bring your sins to confess. Here in God’s house is the wilderness for you now, the Jordan river the baptismal font. For it is here that his preacher is calling you to repent that you receive mercy in Christ. It is here he is preparing you for when he returns again to take away all the wildernesses all the loneliness all the sadness all the death and bring us into his glorious city come down from heaven.----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Advent 1 - Luke 19:28-40

In our sin we treat Christ’s word like last years presents lose interest. Christ however is no throw away savior. He comes to us as a humble king to forgive our sins and assure us of life eternal.

          In the last few years, our society has been called a throw away society. That we have come to such opulence and affluence that we have no reason to try and reuse things once we've used them. You as well as I have heard people gripe, "I had my first washing machine for 30 years and now appliances don't last 10. They break and it's cheaper to replace than repair." Or plastic grocery bags, food containers, disposable cameras. These things were not around many years before. Being a child of this era of throw away, I was completely dumbfounded when I ran into someone who washed ziploc bags to get multiple uses out of them! My mind was blown.

          We want to be the first to use something. There is something to being the first to use an item. To break it in. New cars are one of these items. You know what they say, "There's nothing like the smell of a new car payment." I mean "there's nothing like the smell of a new car." It's true. Being the first. The first to visit a hotel, the first to ride an amusement park ride, the first to eat at the new restaurant, the first in line for Black Friday sales. There is a sort of regency involved with being first. You almost feel like royalty.

          Today's Gospel reading has this sense in it also. We hear Jesus say, "…you will find a colt tied, hon which no one has ever yet sat. Untie it and bring it here. " Is Jesus the beginning of this throw away mentality? "A used donkey will not do. It has lost it's "new donkey" smell." No. Jesus is making a statement that perhaps passes us by if we don't slow down being too anxious with God's word. Instead of passing over this reading, which you've heard many times and might be tempted to think you can just use it, hear it and let it go like a BigMac wrapper. God's word is not like an appliance or electronic device that once we've used it is not as good.

          When Jesus speaks of a colt, a donkey that no one has ever sat on he is indeed making a statement of royalty. This whole scene is one of regency and the coming of a king. When Israel consecrated and received a new king that king would come riding on a donkey. Similar to Ari Force one or the presidential limo. No one else has one like it. The king is coming to you. He is not elected but he comes for your benefit to protect and defend. Our OT reading from Jerimiah was God preparing his people for a special king.

          Jeremiah prophesies that there will be a king who comes to rule God's people. Going back to the days of David, before God's people were torn in division between Israel and Judah. God says through Jeremiah, "Behold, the days are coming, declares the Lord, when I will fulfill the promise I made to the house of Israel and the house of Judah." God has made a promise to his people that their division will be healed. God's people will no longer be divided. There will not be a king in the North and South who is not able to join the people together. In this king will be unity again.

          So who is this king? Who will be the first to really bring unity to God's people again? Luke begins to teach us about this king.

          When you watch a good movie, one cinematography technique is to bring you to a very important event at the beginning of a movie. The event portrayed is very important but to the viewer the event doesn't look important. So the rest of the movie is about the background of the event that the movie began with. It would be like starting a movie of your life with your last days before going to heaven and then the director would go back and say why it was important that you spent your last days with God's word being spoken to you and Jesus' body and blood being given to you as you see the end of your earthly life coming.

          This is what we see today in our Gospel. This is why, even though it is the beginning of our church year, we go to the end of Christ's life as he enters JErusalem during holy week. Why is it important that he comes to Jerusalem? Why is it that it is during the Passover days? Why does Jesus ask for a donkey that has not been sat upon? Why are the Pharisees angry at the disciples for worshipping Jesus?

          The rest of our church calendar is meant to teach us these things and more. The church calendar isn't a throw away practice. We use it and keep using it because in ordering our lives by the life of Christ we are like the earth that rotates around the sun receiving it's light and warmth at the right times. Our life, if not daily, is a returning again and again to Christ to receive from him forgiveness. But this king seems like a throw away king when we begin to be tempted by the flashy new things our sinful flesh likes to chase after.

          Jesus asks for a colt that has not been sat upon because this king comes to his people in a new way. It is a new way, but it is also a very old way. Like when you take a favorite recipe that the family has loved for many years and you make it better. A cover of an old song but you hesitatingly admit, "I like the new one better." Jesus comes on a colt like David and the kings of the OT did. The king came to the people on a donkey.  Not a war horse but a donkey. The king isn't come to destroy the people and conquer them like a general on a warhorse in the battle. No Jesus comes as a king but a new king. A different king.

          Jesus comes in a royal way but don’t be fooled into thinking everyone thought that way. I mean Jesus didn’t come as a worldly king, he even had to procure his own animal for transportation. Even the owners of the animal didn't offer the colt, they didn't know or care what was going on. And don’t think that everyone thought highly of this event. There were no other royalty there. It wasn’t the famous and rich that came out. Jesus came humbly and our world isn’t so impressed with humble kings. Jesus came to his people but it was only by faith that they saw who Jesus really was. A humble king. He has come to do battle but not the old way in conquering earthly kingdoms or people. So, since he is a king who has come to battle with? Where is his battlefield, who is his enemy?

          The enemy is the devil and all who side with sin.

          Jesus has not come to do battle with you. Even though you may have acted like an enemy of Christ, he has not come to destroy us. This is why he comes on a donkey. Donkeys are not for treading people down. They are beasts of burden. And so Jesus comes as a king to serve us. To give his life.

          Now maybe you have treated God's word as a throw away. An old appliance that isn't useful for your everyday life. Perhaps you have considered the way of this king as an old appliance. Like an old record player that gets stuck playing the same song over and over. You have found in the world new things that seem better. Whatever your pleasure is this year was probably not what you were concerned with last year because the joys of this world are fleeting and not permanent. But what is? This king’s kingdom will never fall and his gifts will never expire. While we might tire of this king he never gets tired forgiving you and promising you he will not cast you out.

This king then also does something new again. You see the donkey was his coming to us, he comes humbly. This king though where is his battle? Where is he on a warhorse? It is on the cross. This king is victorious by doing a new thing. He is crucified for you. Even your sins of chasing the cares of the flesh and sinning against your fellow man. He comes to forgive you in real ways.

So it is no surprise that this king lays in a new tomb that has never seen death. Or better yet, death has not seen a king as this. A king whose reign does not end in death but it is his victory. The new, never sat upon colt brought this king to his people so that the new, never laid in tomb might bring us to him.

          This is your king. He comes, he advents to us. And like that day he went into Jerusalem, you will not find this advent king among the well to do. This king comes among the faithful. He comes in humble means still. Not a colt, but in his word and sacraments. The means that he advents to us still does not sparkle in the eyes of the world. Bread, wine and water.  The world does not lay a red carpet out for him. But you and I should with repentant hearts welcome Christ as he comes to us humbly still. He comes for us to lay our  treasures aside that we may this season receive him rightly believing his words, he doesn’t throw you away but takes your sins and they are gone. So reuse him. Christ is no one use redeemer.